Vintage Watch Forums

Vintage Collector’s Site for Discussion
Home
Hamilton Watches for Sale
It is currently Fri Mar 24, 2017 4:04 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog'
PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Dear all. I thought I would start my blog on the task set of me to set - up a permanent wristwatch display. I will try to update regularly with progress. Feedback, question or indeed comments greatly appreciated.

Well after a 25 hour journey starting Alicante Spain via Boston to New York, I arrived Friday at the National Watch & Clock Museum. On Saturday I decided to do some research in the Museum’s magnificent library. For anyone interested in horology, this is the place to look. You don't necessarily have to visit the Museum and Library to use its magnificent archives, much is online with more being added all the time. You can call in and ask the Library staff (Sarah and Nancy) to look for any info you require. NAWCC members receive this service free and for non-members there is just a small charge which is used to buy books, etc.

This time, I wanted to look/study adverts on wristwatches for the exhibition/display I am tasked in setting up. I did check these out last year but recently Nancy Dyer, Library Archivist, has been purchasing and donating many more. I was both amazed and very happy to find two amazing adverts, one from 1908 on a watch worn by Peary on his expedition to the Pole on July 17th 1908. You will be blown away by this two page advert that I will blog separately. The second 'amazing' find was an Elgin advert from 1913 with Louis Disbrow (1876–1939). Disbrow was an American racecar driver, born on September 23, 1876 in Chicago. Disbrow raced in the first four Indianapolis 500, with a best finish of 8th in 1913. The advert (attached) shows him in his racing car wearing his Elgin wristwatch on his RIGHT ARM! The advert states "The Watch for Live Active Men!" Remember that Elgin were at the forefront of trying to convince men to wear wristwatches. 1913 is the earliest American wristwatch advert I have ever seen!

Image

Monday being the Labor Day Holiday, I officially started my position and task on Tuesday 3rd September. First order of the day was signing the Volunteer Agreement - then I could officially start. I logged into the museum's cataloging database (Past Perfect), searched and listed all wristwatches (a total of 1372 objects) that I had photographed and described last year. Here it is printed on 175 double sided pages. I have already started to mark it up with the most possible candidates for the display! This will take up my first few days, studying and selecting possible candidate wristwatches. Not all will make it into the display - fine tuning will take more time and input from Museum Director Noel Poirier and Head Curator Carter Harris. In addition to the pieces I remembered as candidates, I was mighty pleased to have already found some other great pieces that had escaped my memory.

We have an excellent large area for the display with three good walls for graphics (see attached)

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image----

So the 'task' is started!

Adam R Harris
Gallet Guest Curator - wristwatches
Acknowledgements
Wikipedia - Disbrow facts
NAWCC - All pictures are the property of NAWCC and cannot be used without permission

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 4:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Thought you may like an update to History of the Wristwatch - At arms Length. Update #2
As far as is known, humans first began to measure time between the 10th and 8th century before the birth of Christ. The now 24 hours split themselves into three natural divisions; from dawn till noon (the highest point of the sun), from noon till dusk and the hours of darkness. So our clock of those days, some 2020 years ago, used the sun as its time measurement; in fact a sundial. This dial, the earliest of which we have evidence is Egyptian, now in the Berlin museum, dates to approximately the 9th century B.C. If we accept that the pocket watch reached the ‘mass market’ in 1840, we see that it took mechanical timepieces as we accept today some 1,800 years to develop.

My goal is to clearly present ‘The History of the Wristwatch’ from its inception in 1900 to present time 2013. I want to depict that although it took some 1,800 years to develop from a sundial to the mass produced and accepted pocket watch, it only took some (albeit difficult periods) 90 years for the wristwatch to overtake the pocket watch and become the accepted timepiece by 1930.

My idea is to show a small sundial, then 1800 years to a pocket watch, then 90 years to the acceptance of the wristwatch (a Rolex Oyster).

Periods Covered by the exhibit will include:

1900 – Beginning of the Wristwatch
Starting with the 1899-1902 Boer War we see officers wearing “wristlets”, leather bands that held pocket watches. We also have earlier evidence that the future President Theodore Roosevelt, who in 1898 fought in Cuba against Spain, also wore these wristlets. Yet after that military campaign, while Roosevelt was campaigning to be the 25th President, he is quoted as saying “a wristwatch is for a cowboy, hunter or soldier. But NOT for a politician or President.”

1910-1920 – “Trench Watches” or WWI
Here I will show examples of early wristwatches with wire lugs, enamel dial, shrapnel guards, center sweep seconds, etc. I will support this graphically with ephemera of USA WWI soldiers (so called “Doughboys”) – I have a number of great photographs and newspaper articles to include in the exhibit.

Also from 1910-20 we have the “Hermetic” watches period.
Starting with Borgel Cases (1910), through the Gruen/Jean Finger cases 1918/21 to the famous and ‘final’ Rolex “Oyster.” The Museum has an outstanding Elgin 1916 Depollier cases WWI trench watch, in addition to a lovely Rolex with sealed case and shrapnel guard.
I need other hermetics based on Jean Finger Design or 2nd generation Borgel. I will support this graphically with ephemera like the 1919 Gruen advertisement showing the Jean Finger 'style' hermetic case - but unless I donate a piece the Museum does not have one.

1930 – Beginning of the Automatic.
Automatics, of course we start with a Harwood (I will probably use two to show both face and movement); the Museum also has a 1932 Frey Perpetual. More modern, I know we have a Jaeger-Le Coultre and Breitling. Main aim here will be to show early automatic, “bumper” movement, “rotary” movement, “micro” rotor – “bidynator.”

Also 1930s – Art Deco Period Roaring 20s and 30s
I want to show the fantastic 'formed' watches of the 1920s/1930s - Those fantastic Art Deco pieces (I remember a lovely Gallet ladies piece). There is also a fantastic Art Deco 'exploding numbers dial' I must use. The Museum has a number of great examples from Gruen as well.

1940s/50 - 'Multi-Complication' timepieces.
We have a number of pieces including Gallet, Benrus, Mido and Movado. The best piece I will use of the Museum’s is a Comor Index Mobile - Rattrapante! It’s fantastic! These will cover 40s/50s/60s and 70s

1980s – The Demise of the Swiss and the Americans and the Development of the Quartz.
Museum has examples from Hamilton, Elgin, Gruen and others, not sure (from memory) what Swiss manufacturers’ quartz they have – hopefully a Rolex Cellina. I will depict that the Swiss and the Americans competed in the analogue quartz arena. Actually quartz survived, where the Americans and Swiss got it wrong is they believed in ‘digital’ wristwatches – that failed! Quartz survived. In 2012 a total of 995 million wristwatches were produced; 78% quartz analog, 19% digital, and a fraction 3% mechanical.
And out of that 995 million pieces – Japan produced 590 million of them. So we must show Japanese timepieces like Seiko, Casio and Citizen – will Hamilton help? In 2012 the Swiss produced just under 7 million units or 0.70%, but in value was number one at $23 billion! As Mr. Hayek, Senior once said “It is easier to sell one watch at $1million, than sell 1 million pieces at a dollar.”

1990 to 2012 - Size Matters
Showing here modern (mainly quartz) pieces and the explosion in size compared to watches from 1910s and 1920s. We have some cool modern pieces from Hamilton, Citizen, Yes and others.

2013 – Being Donated by Swatch Group
SWATCH – System 51. First mechanical Automatic from SWATCH – 51 pcs. Price $150
Some Pictures:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Please pass us your thoughts

Pictures are property of of NAWCC and may not be used without permission

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 11:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 12:54 pm
Posts: 3320
Location: Windsor
I was going to suggest the Hamilton Electric as the first battery powered watch...until I noticed the Pacer in your photos.

_________________
Moderator


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 12:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Dave wrote:
I was going to suggest the Hamilton Electric as the first battery powered watch...until I noticed the Pacer in your photos.


I will be more Hamilton electrics.
They were already in a display, so will take them to-morrow
I complete first layout 1900 -- 1930

To-morrow is 40S
Thanks the input
regards

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 12:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:59 am
Posts: 1382
This is awesome Adam, I really envy your experience here!

_________________
Rob

"Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." (John Wayne)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:17 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
indyago wrote:
This is awesome Adam, I really envy your experience here!


Thanks Rob
Yes it is "awesome" and I envy myself too.
Thanks
adam

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
sorry, lack of time in the forum, been busy preparing her - latest update
Step-by-step we move the exhibition forward. That said, not every step is forward. For me it’s a learning process and sometimes my pre-thought ideas just are not working out as I had anticipated, so again and again I revisit the display.

Tuesday, previous to last, I started to move timepieces to the gallery location. I carefully laid each timepiece out, many with original adverts or related ephemera. That took some two days just to position the pieces.

Although in my opinion it looked “good”, I felt something was not correct. Too cramped possibly? I could not see a good solution, so I kept re-visiting the layout, fine tuning it, but could still not see a solution. Museum Director Noel Poirier and I had a meeting at the display to review how it looked. After some fifteen to twenty minutes, I could understand where I was going wrong. That day, based on Noel’s (and others’ input) I reworked the display cases. Although these may not be the final pieces or even the final layout, I am much happier and feel “It may not be the beginning of the end, but it is the end of the beginning.”


The first display case starts at c. 1900 (wristlet/first ladies wristwatches) to WWI.
Image

Image

Image

Next we have a small case for hermetic or so called “purse” watches.
Image


We come to “The Roaring 20s” and 1930s ‘Formed Watches/Transitional Period’– My first ideas on graphical illustration can be seen her. These are VERY draft, and will be high definition “collage” style graphic ABOVE the date line.
Image

Image

Image

Next Cabinet – very important – “Birth of Automatic” – you can see here my graphic ideas in the raw, VERY raw!
Image
Image

Here I am ‘trying to show difference between “bumper” and “rotor” automatic movements.
Image

Next case is 1940s & 1950s – Complications Arrive and “The Quartz Revolution”
Image

Image

Displaying the “electric” watch that evolved prior to quartz (late 1950s versus quartz 1980s). Will use graphics to explain difference between quartz and electric.
Image

Image

This may prove the hardest. I want to show the evolution of the wristwatch movement from mechanical to bumper, to rotor, to electric, to quartz, to kinetic. Difficult this one.
Image

Final display case is for modern pieces – size is everything – Hoping to emphasize Moon watch as well.
Image

Image

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
NAWCC – all images are property of NAWCC and can not be used without permission.

Adam R Harris
Gallet- Guest Curator-Wristwatches

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 2:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:50 am
Posts: 2729
Location: California
I thought the first wrist watch was Patek in the late 1800's?

How about the first water proof watch for your display?

_________________
mark@vintagehamilton.com
VWF owner, moderator and Hamilton Enthusiast


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: HELP - Hamilton Info/Adverts
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Nookster wrote:
I thought the first wrist watch was Patek in the late 1800's?

How about the first water proof watch for your display?


Hi Mark - thanks for reading and posting - appreciated.
No Breguet was first at 1810 with a wrist watch for Queen of Naples, next was Patek Philippe 1869 for countess Koscowicz of Hungary.

What did I say, please point me to it in case I made some error (very possible)
The watches above were 'one offs' made for 'Queens' my dates are for 'general mass use'

Hope that makes sense.

Can YOU help me.?
I urgently need another (different) to mine Hamilton Cross Country advert? (you can see mine in the pictures).
I need a high definition scan/copy to use in a collage, anyone help?
Also DESPERATELY want good pictures of or pictorial diagrams of
1) Quartz
2) Electric (Hamilton)
3) Tuning Fork (Bullova)

also any other 'great' Hamilton Electric adverts or Piping Rock

I have some (nothing on Piping Rock) but want to see if I can improve
would be REALLY helpful

Please all look
thanks

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:50 am
Posts: 2729
Location: California
I missed that part of the first wrist watch.....

I will look for some of my ads. I was going to make a link to Hamilton Ads and other ads for other brands for people to post, the only problem is non members come in here and look and take stuff.

I just did some cool identification stuff that will be done by Christmas.

_________________
mark@vintagehamilton.com
VWF owner, moderator and Hamilton Enthusiast


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 10:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Nookster wrote:
I missed that part of the first wrist watch.....

I will look for some of my ads. I was going to make a link to Hamilton Ads and other ads for other brands for people to post, the only problem is non members come in here and look and take stuff.

I just did some cool identification stuff that will be done by Christmas.


Hi Mark
Yes I really need a different '5 continents' I will donate mine and that will go with the watch in the showcase, but I want one up on the graphic collage.
My email is adam007@gmail.com

Needs high definition scans

Thanks

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Every Sign Tells a Story.

“If one flower can say 1,000 words, think what a bunch would say,” so the quote says.

In my task case – a permanent wristwatch display showing the ‘history of the wristwatch’ it is going to take a lot more than a lot of timepieces or words. Too many words and people get tired, too few and no message is given. Similar with the timepieces – too many and people just cannot take it all in.

How to get round this is a mixture of words (descriptions) and powerful graphics. My goal is to make a display, with bold graphics where the “picture’ tells the story. Easy? Actually no. Luckily I have a lot of experience and talent around me, and with their help, I am sure we will achieve our goal.

Therefore since last update, I am concentrating on the ‘date line’ bullet descriptors, the individual watch descriptions and, of course, the graphics.

Below are some photographs of the first three displays that is:

1) 1900 – 1919
2) Hermetic/Purse watches
3) 1920s to 1940s

The date line summaries are my first draft, both Noel Poirier, myself and others are constantly going back to them to see not ‘if’ but how they can be improved. The graphics you see on the wall are purely the pictures I am intending to scan in and turn into powerful visuals.

Here is a picture of our ‘draft’ proposed graphics:
Image
Next a picture of Display Case #1 with my 1st cut descriptor tags.
Image

Image

Here is some idea of graphics above Display Case #1:
Image
Image

Display Case # 2 – Hermetic (purse) watches
Image

Display Case #3 – 1920 to 1940
Image

Image

Finally the draft graphics above Hermetic and Display Case # 3
Image
Adam R Harris
National Watch & Clock Museum Gallet Guest Curator of Wristwatches

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 5:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 1:19 pm
Posts: 1055
Location: NJ
Adam...
This is INCREDIBLE!!!!
I really hope to get my butt to the museum to see this!
Please keep us posted as to your progress... VERY exciting
My friend!!!!
G

_________________
Just living in Rick's world...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 6:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
GJH wrote:
Adam...
This is INCREDIBLE!!!!
I really hope to get my butt to the museum to see this!
Please keep us posted as to your progress... VERY exciting
My friend!!!!
G

Thanks Greg
probably another 10 weeks work, and i am in 7 days a week.

I also suspect i must leave before i see the final graphics in place (cry)

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:18 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
Light at the end of the tunnel and ‘exciting additions’

We are now 5 weeks into the setting up of a permanent wristwatch display, and slowly I can see ‘light at the end of the tunnel’

The fine tuning continues, with minor changes in each display case, I added three very interesting pieces but removed two that were duplicates
There are now 122 pieces on display 70 of which have not been displayed before, that is always exciting to a Museum.

During this week I completed the individual descriptions for ‘beginning of automatics’ (30s), 40/50 (complications), ‘electric timepieces’ (60/70s) and quartz (80s/90s)

I am particularly pleased with the ‘electric’ and automatic’ display cases. Not being so knowledgeable on electric timepieces, I had to do a lot of interesting research.

Another exciting incident happened this week. A member dropped off four very early Jeweler’s wristwatch window display units.
They were very distressed, probably having been stored in damp conditions for 60 yrs. Anyway, I immediately saw their fantastic potential and set about cleaning and restoring them. Two are now proudly out on display an early Elgin (30s) and a slightly later Gruen (50s).
Below you can see the results – I feel they really enhance the overall display, and are an important part of the ‘History of the wristwatch.’

See latest pictures below:
Adam R. Harris

1930/40 and 50s – Complications Arrive

Image


80s and 90 – Quartz Arrives – Big Time
Image


Birth of the Automatic – 1930s
Image

Image


Electrical wristwatches – predecessor to quartz
Image


Added my original April 1918 letter from, King George V to all American WWI soldiers
Image


Two NEW EXCITING additions!

Image

Image

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
There is more to the Museum than ‘just’ setting up the display. Week 6

Of course my main task here is to set up the permanent wristwatch display – The History of the Wristwatch.
But other interesting events happen, that I enjoy immensely. This week we met and hosted the larger than like character Jim Ebright aka Eeeb from forum ‘Watch U Seek’.

After an 8 hour drive from Columbus, Ohio, Jim spent all day with use, starting with a full two hour tour of the library and archives. Thanks to Nancy Dyer , Librarian and Archivist. The library and records are just so extensive; it takes someone with Nancy’s huge knowledge to explain it.
After a quick lunch, I gave Jim a tour of the highlights of the Museum pieces culminating with a full tour of the ‘wristwatch’ display.
Jim is most knowledgeable in High end Quartz, and has offered to return with some pieces to augment the display.

Later in the week, I could enjoy meeting some visitors who had brought watches in for some ‘thoughts’. This is most interesting and it seems we could discover a previously unknown Illinois wristwatch. Fantastic stuff.

Now back to the display. I continue to work my way through the cases, I am pleased to have now completed layout and display tags from 1900 to present.
I re-tuned the ‘electric’ display, and I am now happy to that, and after much work on the ‘2000/Present’ display, that is really starting to take shape too.

Of course more ‘fine-tuning’ will happen, but next part of my agenda is the ‘novelty’ case and ‘graphics’

Adam

Pictures next
First the Electric Display – revamped:
Image

Now the ‘present’ display:
Here is Desert Storm, Omega Speedmaster and a Timex Data-Link
Image

Here is the ‘theme’ of the display – ‘Size Matters’
Image

A few more shots of the display, comparing ’jump watches’ wristwatches from 1930, 1950, and 2000 and ‘eco-drive’ technology
Image

Image

Image

Some updated ‘draft’ graphics, a letter from King George V to the American troops in 1918, Electa Officer wearing a watch and shrapnel guards advert from 1918:
Image

All pictures are property of NAWCC and cannot be used without permission

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 12:26 pm
Posts: 2199
Location: near the mean streets of Detroit
What happened to all of the images??

_________________
Rick
..................................................
scio me nihil scire or scio me nescire


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
HamiltonIllinois wrote:
What happened to all of the images??


Hi Rick
after reaching 3000 images on PhotoBucket, I had to organize and make folders.
That seems to have now lkost the photos.
If anyone specifically asks, I can re-post them.

So far no one noticed!

Regard

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2015 8:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2013 10:04 am
Posts: 784
Yes we did.

I ask one of the moderators about it quite some time ago in a pm, it was suggested you probably had removed or stopped your photobucket acct.

_________________
"A man is no better than what he leaves behind"
Cecil B. DeMille

Try to remember, Just because you read it on the internet, doesn't make it true!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thread: NAWCC - Gallet Guest Curator-wristwatches. 'blog
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2015 8:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am
Posts: 2666
Location: Spain - Costa Blanca
watchdoc wrote:
Yes we did.

I ask one of the moderators about it quite some time ago in a pm, it was suggested you probably had removed or stopped your photobucket acct.


No, it was quite unintentional, and I have all the photos in my account.
I am happy to reconstitute it.

Thanks
adam

_________________
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
NAWCC seeks to encourage and stimulate interest in the art and science of timekeeping. http://www.nawcc.org
Adam R Harris


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Terms of Service