Tools

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Valtyr
Posts: 219
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:32 pm

Re: Tools

#11 Post by Valtyr » Mon Feb 27, 2012 5:40 am

Just look at that leg support!!!

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Bazzab
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Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 7:37 am

Re: Tools

#12 Post by Bazzab » Mon Feb 27, 2012 1:49 pm

These are also good for support! :oops:
So I been told :lol: :lol:
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pwhandman
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Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:25 pm

Re: Tools

#13 Post by pwhandman » Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:39 am

This is my 1st day here, and thought I'd comment on the vacuum/nylon idea...but now I'm not sure I want to get involved. :lol: At least with those last couple posts-ha!
I also use a white sheet that is attached to the edge of my work table and drapes down onto the floor a foot or two; usually anything dropped lands on it-but we all know how that goes. :roll:
(Depending on what you're using 'em for,if you buy Queen XXX size you save $$)
-PWhandman

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trim
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 2:03 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: Tools

#14 Post by trim » Thu Mar 29, 2012 4:52 pm

pwhandman wrote:This is my 1st day here, and thought I'd comment on the vacuum/nylon idea...but now I'm not sure I want to get involved. :lol: At least with those last couple posts-ha!
I also use a white sheet that is attached to the edge of my work table and drapes down onto the floor a foot or two; usually anything dropped lands on it-but we all know how that goes. :roll:
(Depending on what you're using 'em for,if you buy Queen XXX size you save $$)
-PWhandman
One can also use a white apron with velco, that snags under the edge of your bench.

Old timers used to have a wood framed canvas lined tray that pulls out and is nicely tummy shaped.

I guess the catch rate is near 100% once your tweezers are under control, and you're no longer dealing with 'pings'
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GeneJockey
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Location: San Francisco Peninsula

Re: Tools

#15 Post by GeneJockey » Fri Mar 30, 2012 7:53 am

Somewhere around here is an Elgin 8/0 click spring, which was last seen ALMOST correctly installed in its recess in the plate. It was last FELT lightly bouncing off my face before leaving for parts unknown. Good thing I have 4 or 5 8/0 parts movements!

Regarding getting down to 100% catch rate, there's an old joke about a retiring watchmaker saying he had enjoyed his 20 years of watchmaking.

Someone says, "But you've been doing this for 30 years!"

He replies, "20 years as a watchmaker, 10 years spent on the floor looking for lost parts."
http://gjselgins.blogspot.com/

Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent. - Pogo

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indyago
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Re: Tools

#16 Post by indyago » Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:20 am

^^^Nice one! I will have to remember that one! :D
Rob

"Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." (John Wayne)

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trim
Posts: 282
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Location: New Zealand

Re: Tools

#17 Post by trim » Fri Mar 30, 2012 10:50 am

GeneJockey wrote: Regarding getting down to 100% catch rate, there's an old joke about a retiring watchmaker saying he had enjoyed his 20 years of watchmaking.

Someone says, "But you've been doing this for 30 years!"

He replies, "20 years as a watchmaker, 10 years spent on the floor looking for lost parts."
You wouldn't believe the number of small screws, springs and even dial washers, I pulled out of the inside of an old watchmaker's Bergeon 2339 automatic lid oiler when I dismantled and cleaned it (not my photo).

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Redbone
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Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2014 11:53 am

Re: Tools

#18 Post by Redbone » Fri Aug 22, 2014 11:50 am

I dip snuff so I use the left over cans for parts bins, the lids snap on so the are dust free, also some type of pick would be helpful I made mine out of a piece of peg wood and a sewing needle

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jkpenrod
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Location: Bealeton, VA
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Re: Tools

#19 Post by jkpenrod » Wed Mar 04, 2015 9:02 am

I thought I would revive this as I have a couple of questions.
trim wrote: Basic Detailing Tools

You will be able to remove the movement from the case (for cleaning of the case), remove the hands (clean, polish and maybe relume) and dial (dusting, or cleaning if enamel).
  • Hand pushers (metal or nylon tipped, but you can get by with a drilled bit of peg wood)
I am having trouble finding these. Is it called something different?
trim wrote: Basic Servicing Tools

The next step, servicing basic movements
  • Oilers
Do you recommend dip oilers or automatic. I like the idea of automatic, but I am finding very few available.
Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

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