Tools

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trim
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Tools

#1 Post by trim » Sat Feb 25, 2012 2:05 pm

Thought I'd post some suggestions on tools for beginners.

I have no doubt made omissions, comments welcome and feel free to add (or subtract) 8-)

Basic Detailing Tools

You will be able to remove the movement from the case (for cleaning of the case), remove the hands (clean, polish and maybe relume) and dial (dusting, or cleaning if enamel).
  • Loupe: 5x or 10x
  • Case knife
  • Case opener
  • Screw Drivers: 0.50, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 are the most needed sizes.
  • Screw Driver guide (for refinishing screwdrivers - keeping them in perfect condition and alignment)
  • Stone (for above) plus refinishing your tweezers
  • Tweezers: I like my (Dumont) #3 Ti and #1 Brass - but there is a lot of personal preference here.
  • Hand removers (I prefer the K&D style but Bergeon ones work fine as well)
  • Hand pushers (metal or nylon tipped, but you can get by with a drilled bit of peg wood)
I still don't own a bracelet pin pusher, but other people seem to suggest them - YMMV.

Basic Detailing Consumables
  • Rodico
  • Rodico: not a mistake I listed it twice, it is that essential :D
  • Peg wood
  • Micro fibre cloth (glasses type)
  • Lint and Acid free paper (Kimwipes or watchmaker's paper)
  • finger cots
Books
  • Practical Watchmaking by Donald De Carle
  • The Watch Repairers Manual by Henry B. Fried
  • The Chicago School Course; Master Watchmaking. A Modern, Complete, Practical Course", by Thomas B. Sweazey and Byron G. Sweazey.
Basic Servicing Tools

The next step, servicing basic movements
  • Loupe: 15x
  • Oilers
  • Pin Vice
  • Tweezers: finer work calls for a Dumont #4 or #5 (hairspring and incabloc work)
  • Mainspring winders
  • Wheel puller (Bergeon) for 5 spoke indirect seconds wheels - best to avoid bending pinions.
  • Crystal lift
  • Crystal press
Basic Servicing Consumables
  • Pith wood
  • Mobius 9010 (wrist watches)
  • Mobius 9020 (pocket watches)
  • Mobius 941 (pallet jewels)
  • Mobius 8200 (Barrel grease)
  • Mobius 8030 (Setting works)
  • L&R Cleaning fluid or Quality Lighter Fluid (Naphtha)
There are subst to the above oils, but this basic set of 5 means you can service almost anything vintage - high freq and modern autos have special requirements.

Your screwdrivers and tweezers get the most wear and tear, so it is important to keep the blades properly formed and touch them up regularly.

Brands, Dumont, Bergeon, Horotec or for tighter budgets A*F is also fine.

I really liked the following list (All credit to lysander for the following)
Tools that should be high quality:
  • Screwdivers (or at least the blades)
  • Tweezers
  • Movement holder(s)

Tools that it really doesn't matter that much:
  • Case vise
  • Case cushions
  • Parts trays
  • Dip oilers
Tools that can can destroy stuff whether high quality or low quality:
  • Case back openers, either two or three jaw style or Rolex style
  • Case back knives/levers
  • Hand removers
  • Hand setters
Stuff that must be high quality:
  • Cleaning products I'll add pithwood to this, I've bought some terrible stuff and it is important
  • Lubricants
However, don't confuse high price with high quality. Nye GP synthetic is just as good as Meobius 9010, but less expensive. A good condition used K&D hand puller is both cheaper and better quality than a new Bergeon (IMO). And, a good used staking set is a better value than a new one.
Please don't by a cheap "watchmaker's" set you will end up ruining your watch and replacing all the tools anyway. A good tool can make all the difference in the quality and ease of the work.

Indian (Anchor) hand pullers in the K&D style are fine if you refinish the legs where they contact the dial. Dial protectors are a good idea, but watch paper or thin plastic (bag) work fine too. Remember to take your time with cosmetic care, with our vintages that is critical.

After this stage, you know plenty to choose your own gear: lathe, staking set, jeweling jet (Sietz or Horia), Jacquot tool, polishers, poising tools, roller removers, pinion straighteners, etc. the list is endless.
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GLADIATOR
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Re: Tools

#2 Post by GLADIATOR » Sun Feb 26, 2012 1:47 am

Thanks.
Good tip/info
Regards
"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done."
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Malibu
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Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Tools

#3 Post by Malibu » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:09 am

trim wrote:...[*]finger cots...
How do you feel about substituting latex gloves?

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Bazzab
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Re: Tools

#4 Post by Bazzab » Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:44 am

Tools to add!!
A magnet For finding the pieces that PING on the floor!!and they will!!!!
I find a kitchen knife magnet works best,the long type.
Kept magnets well away from watches

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Valtyr
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Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:32 pm

Re: Tools

#5 Post by Valtyr » Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:36 am

Also, in the search for dropped pieces, you can put a nylon on the head of a vacuum baton/handle and use the suction to pull up the little things you'll drop too.

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trim
Posts: 281
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 2:03 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: Tools

#6 Post by trim » Sun Feb 26, 2012 8:10 pm

Malibu wrote:
trim wrote:...[*]finger cots...
How do you feel about substituting latex gloves?
I think the powder free ones would be good for detailing, and I know some people use them while servicing - but I only wear a single finger cot on my left index finger and have no personal experience wearing full gloves. Almost everything should be manipulated with tweezers or pegwood, I only use my finger (with cot) to steady the movement when tightening screws. I guess my concern would be bunching in the finger tips of gloves - but do what works best for you.
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trim
Posts: 281
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Location: New Zealand

Re: Tools

#7 Post by trim » Sun Feb 26, 2012 8:13 pm

Bazzab wrote:Tools to add!!
A magnet For finding the pieces that PING on the floor!!and they will!!!!
I find a kitchen knife magnet works best,the long type.
Kept magnets well away from watches
Yes, I have one of these magnetic knife blocks too! I suppose we really ought to add a demagnetizer to the list as well :lol:
Valtyr wrote:Also, in the search for dropped pieces, you can put a nylon on the head of a vacuum baton/handle and use the suction to pull up the little things you'll drop too.
I don't wear nylons.... :shock:

I really must try this sometime, but for some illogical reason the idea scares the **** out of me. I use a brush and pan plus the magnet as above.
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Valtyr
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Re: Tools

#8 Post by Valtyr » Sun Feb 26, 2012 8:42 pm

That is unfortunate!!!

Nothing gives my calves the support they need like a finely made nylon :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Malibu
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Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Tools

#9 Post by Malibu » Mon Feb 27, 2012 1:03 am

Valtyr wrote:That is unfortunate!!!

Nothing gives my calves the support they need like a finely made nylon :lol: :lol: :lol:
Ooooh!.....too much information! :lol:

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Bazzab
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Re: Tools

#10 Post by Bazzab » Mon Feb 27, 2012 5:32 am

Nice Legs Valtry 8-) 8-)
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