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SMcDaniel001
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:48 am

Hello all

#1 Post by SMcDaniel001 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:14 am

Hello from Nashville, TN. I have a variety of hobbies like most of us probably do.

And pocket watches are something I've been into for a while although not enough to venture out and find a forum. I'm not brave enough to take one apart yet, but if I had an old inoperable beater I might be willing to rip into one.

I have a Elgin Father Time that was the first I had collected. From 1902 it appears. It has been a strong runner from the day I got it. But over the last six months I noticed it had started losing a little time. Not horrible but enough I wanted to have it looked at. I'd never had the watch serviced so I began looking for someone to do the work for me. The Nashville Fairgrounds Flea market has a guy that deals in a lot of watches and takes them back to his shop (St Louis I believe) and repairs them. I dropped the watch off and a couple months later came back and picked it up. I got it back just yesterday.

I don't know the guy that worked on my watch. Only by reputation. And I don't want to imply he ripped me off, but the watch runs slower than ever now. He said if I had any issue for a year to bring it back. Problem is I hate being without it for another month. After you have one serviced, is it normal for one to run a little slow at first?

mrtoad
Posts: 771
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2012 4:02 pm
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Re: Hello all

#2 Post by mrtoad » Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:56 pm

Welcome to the Forum!

No, it is not normal for a watch to run slower after servicing, unless it was running too fast before it went in and the watchmaker has brought it back into regulation.

If it was slow before, the watchmaker should have speeded it up some.

That being said, there are many reasons why a watch may be running slow. Obviously, it may be slow because it's full of dust and dried oil and needs to be cleaned. But it may, for example, have a weak mainspring. Old mainsprings tend to lose their springiness, particularly in a watch that is wound tight but isn't running. A watch that's over a century old might well be in that state. Without pulling the mainspring out of the barrel, it's hard to know for sure.

If the person in question comes to Nashville regularly, I'd ask him. But there are probably good local watchmakers in a place as big as Nashville; you just have to ask around.

In the long run, do think about picking up some practice watches and some tools. If you get a lot of watches, it's cheaper to maintain them yourself, as a lot of us do.

stryfox
Posts: 2252
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 4:40 pm

Re: Hello all

#3 Post by stryfox » Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:30 pm

Mrtoad is spot on.
I would contact the person who serviced it first and explain what it is doing and that you are not satisfied. Also ask if the mainspring was replaced. If you feel comfortable after your conversation I would give him another shot to make you happy. If you don’t like how the conversation goes I would look for someone else.

SMcDaniel001
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:48 am

Re: Hello all

#4 Post by SMcDaniel001 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:21 am

mrtoad wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:56 pm
.............

In the long run, do think about picking up some practice watches and some tools. If you get a lot of watches, it's cheaper to maintain them yourself, as a lot of us do.
That's probably something I should do. I'm a fairly mechanical kinda guy. And pointers on good tools and where to get them?

mrcardigan
Posts: 411
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2016 1:13 pm

Re: Hello all

#5 Post by mrcardigan » Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:29 am

Hi, and welcome.

I'd suggest browsing through the 'Repairing, Renovating and Restoring your watch' section. I only started a year or two back, and am now happily servicing and restoring my own watches. There is a wealth of info on there.

Tools you will definitely need to start with :
A good set of watchmaker screwdrivers
Several loupes or magnifiers
A movement holder
Cleaning solution (I use hagerty)
Rodico for cleaning watch faces
Hand pullers
Tweezers
Strap remover
Ultrasonic cleaning machine (I got a perfectly good jewellery one for £25 from Maplins that suits me fine, but many will spend far more).

Tools wise, I bought a dirt cheap watch repair toolkit, then upgraded stuff as I went along when needed. But the screwdrivers must be decent quality or you will just end up knackering screws.

Then buy a load of cheap movements and start having a go (most of these will not make it, so don't start on nice ones!!!)

Enjoy it, I do,

Andy C

SMcDaniel001
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:48 am

Re: Hello all

#6 Post by SMcDaniel001 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:41 pm

mrcardigan wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:29 am
Hi, and welcome.

I'd suggest browsing through the 'Repairing, Renovating and Restoring your watch' section. I only started a year or two back, and am now happily servicing and restoring my own watches. There is a wealth of info on there.

Tools you will definitely need to start with :
A good set of watchmaker screwdrivers
Several loupes or magnifiers
A movement holder
Cleaning solution (I use hagerty)
Rodico for cleaning watch faces
Hand pullers
Tweezers
Strap remover
Ultrasonic cleaning machine (I got a perfectly good jewellery one for £25 from Maplins that suits me fine, but many will spend far more).

Tools wise, I bought a dirt cheap watch repair toolkit, then upgraded stuff as I went along when needed. But the screwdrivers must be decent quality or you will just end up knackering screws.

Then buy a load of cheap movements and start having a go (most of these will not make it, so don't start on nice ones!!!)

Enjoy it, I do,

Andy C
Thanks man. Looks like I have a new hobby for the winter..........

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